London Art Reviews

Magazine of art press and reviews from London

The extraordinary exhibition about Sicily, at the British Museum, London.

David Franchi – Thursday, 1st September 2016

Limestone head from a temple, Selinous, Sicily, c. 540–510 BC. Museo Archeologico Regionale A Salinas, Palermo © Regione Siciliana, image co. British Museum, London.

Limestone head from a temple, Selinous, Sicily, c. 540–510 BC. Museo Archeologico Regionale A Salinas, Palermo © Regione Siciliana, image co. British Museum, London.

Sicily was presented with an interesting exhibition by The British Museum, London.

Last April, The British Museum opened in London the first exhibition in the UK spanning over the 4000 years of history of the island of Sicily.

“Sicily: culture and conquest” approached differently the exciting history of the biggest Mediterranean island, which nowadays is part of the Italian territory.

Sicily has always played an essential role in the Mediterranean area. The exhibition “Sicily: culture and conquest” focused on two extraordinary periods in the island history when its culture, political importance and military ability could challenge those of the other Mediterranean dominant populations.

Over 200 objects were brought together to London to disclose the richness of the architectural, archaeological and artistic legacies of Sicily, including many coming to the UK for the very first time.

The first flourishing period began between 800 and 700 BC: Phoenicians and then Greeks arrived in Sicily and they mixed with local cultures. The second period occurred under the rule of Normans from northern France who occupied Sicily starting from 1061, kicking off Arabs.

These two periods were chosen because… (continue on our website)  http://www.londonartreviews.com/index.php/museums/266-the-extraordinary-exhibition-about-sicily-at-the-british-museum-london

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This entry was posted on October 26, 2016 by in Museums, Reviews and tagged , , , .

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