London Art Reviews

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Egyptian exhibition “Sunken cities” submerged of visitors at The British Museum, London – part one.

Colossal statue of god Hapy, Thonis-Heracleion, Aboukir Bay, Egypt, ph. Christoph Gerigk © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation, co. British Museum, London.

Colossal statue of god Hapy, Thonis-Heracleion, Aboukir Bay, Egypt, ph. Christoph Gerigk © Franck Goddio / Hilti Foundation, co. British Museum, London.

London (part one) – The exhibitionSunken cities: Egypt’s lost worlds” at The British Museum was amazing.

For The British Museum in London, this is the first major exhibition of archaeological sunken findings. It explores the story of Thonis- Heracleion and Canopus, two Egyptian cities situated at the mouth of the River Nile which have been underwater for about 1,300 years. Their ongoing rediscovery under the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea is modifying our idea of the rich interaction between ancient Egypt and Greece. Remarkable underwater footage and photography were used throughout the exhibition.

The ruins submerged in the sea were located by the French underwater archaeologist Franck Goddio in 2000. Until then, researchers were not sure if Heracleion and Thonis were two cities or one and the same. However, up to today, the 95% of the ruins are still uncovered.

Probably, Thonis- Heracleion and Canopus were founded during the 7th century BC. Their ruins are today in the Abukir Bay, currently 2.5 km off the coast, under 10m (30ft) of water. The two cities sank in the sixth, or the seventh century A.D., probably because of large earthquakes and flooding.

continues on the new website…

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One comment on “Egyptian exhibition “Sunken cities” submerged of visitors at The British Museum, London – part one.

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This entry was posted on January 28, 2017 by in Museums, Reviews and tagged , , , , .

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